A comparison of visual learners and auditory learners

Tactile Auditory If you are an auditory learner, you learn by hearing and listening.

A comparison of visual learners and auditory learners

Advanced Search Abstract Visual and auditory motion information can be used together to provide complementary information about the movement of objects. To investigate the neural substrates of such cross-modal integration, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess brain activation while subjects performed separate visual and auditory motion discrimination tasks.

Areas conjointly activated by both tasks included lateral parietal cortex, lateral frontal cortex, anterior midline and anterior insular cortex. The parietal site encompassed distinct, but partially overlapping, zones of activation in or near the intraparietal sulcus IPS.

A subsequent task requiring an explicit cross-modal speed comparison revealed several foci of enhanced activity relative to the unimodal tasks. These included the IPS, anterior midline, and anterior insula but not frontal cortex. During the unimodal auditory motion task, portions of the dorsal visual motion system showed signals depressed below resting baseline.

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Thus, interactions between the two systems involved either enhancement or suppression depending on the stimuli present and the nature of the perceptual task. Together, these results identify human cortical regions involved in polysensory integration and the attentional selection of cross-modal motion information.

Introduction A common characteristic of both visual and auditory perception is the ability to determine the speed and direction of a moving object, such as an automobile passing on the street.

The visual and auditory sensory information associated with the automobile presumably merges or becomes coordinated, thereby producing a unified percept of the movement of the object within the environment. Additionally, both systems may interact to coordinate and direct attention to one modality or the other, and to control subsequent action.

However, it remains unclear how similar the auditory and visual motion systems might be, and more specifically how and where the two systems interact. The cortical mechanisms responsible for visual motion perception have received much study in animals and, more recently, in humans.

A comparison of visual learners and auditory learners

In monkeys, the cortical processing of visual motion is thought to involve a number of anatomically inter-connected visual areas and their subdivisions referred to, here, as the dorsal motion pathway. Information from the dorsal motion pathway is then thought to influence distinct portions of prefrontal cortex Wilson et al.

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Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learning Styles (VAK) Advanced Search Abstract Visual and auditory motion information can be used together to provide complementary information about the movement of objects.

A similar picture is emerging from neuroimaging and lesion studies in humans. Areas V1 and V2 in humans are responsive to visual motion, but more selective responses can be obtained from extrastriate visual areas located laterally and dorsally in the occipital and parietal lobes.

For instance, hMT, the likely homolog of the simian middle temporal visual area, MT, is strongly activated by visual motion stimuli and by tasks involving a visual motion discrimination Corbetta et al.

Additionally, the same stimuli and tasks concurrently activate areas in dorsal occipital cortex and in posterior parietal cortex. Together, these areas may constitute a dorsal motion processing system that is analogous, if not homologous, to the comparable simian system Felleman and Van Essen, Compared to our detailed understanding of visual motion pathways, we know relatively little about pathways for auditory motion processing.

Anatomical studies in monkeys suggest that there are two auditory streams as in visionone of which includes a system for auditory space analysis that originates in the caudal belt and parabelt region surrounding primary auditory cortex and projects to periarcuate cortex Azuma and Suzuki, ; Romanski et al.

Presumably, some cells can selectively respond to changes in IID and ITD over time, thereby representing sound source movement. However, in primates the identification of a specific system of interconnected cortical areas for processing auditory motion per se is currently lacking.

Lesion studies have shown that apparent sound-source movement in humans can be selectively disrupted when right parietal and right insular cortex is compromised Griffiths et al. Despite some inconsistencies across studies, a picture is emerging of several cortical regions that are activated during auditory motion processing and may function as a system for auditory motion analysis.

Where and how the visual and auditory motion systems interact is not well understood. Such interactions must occur if a task requires explicit comparison of information from both modalities. In such instances, information about the direction and speed of moving objects seems to be derived separately within each modality, and then compared after conversion to a common supramodal representation Stein et al.

Presumably, attention is allocated between and within modalities during such tasks to ensure that the appropriate task-relevant information is passed on to decision-making and behavioral-control systems.

Where these various cross-modal interactions occur in humans is not known. In monkeys, several cortical areas have been shown to contain cells that respond to both visual and auditory stimuli, including temporal cortex Benevento et al.Physical learners might appear a bit scattered in comparison to auditory and visual learners, so sales conversations may not run according to a fixed structure.

Prospects with a kinesthetic learning style will likely display more physical engagement in meetings, using large hand gestures and . Aug 29,  · We've all heard the theory that some students are visual learners, while others are auditory learners.

And still other kids learn best when lessons . Hyland's Japanese learners favored Auditory and Tactile styles, and disfavored Visual and Group styles (). Hyland also reports that senior students favored kinesthetic. Understanding whether you are a visual, auditory, or tactile learner will allow you adopt the study techniques best suited to your skills and needs.

Adapt Your Studying Techniques to Your Learning Style. Search the site GO. For Students & Parents. Homework Help Learning Styles & Skills Tools & Tips Study Methods Visual learners are.

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Visual Learners vs. Auditory Learners. When I went to school, educators assumed that there were only two kinds of learners: good ones and bad ones.

Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learning Styles (VAK) The VAK learning style uses the three main sensory receivers: Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic (movement) to determine the dominant learning style. Aug 29,  · We've all heard the theory that some students are visual learners, while others are auditory learners. And still other kids learn best when lessons . Do Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learners Need Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Instruction? By Daniel T. Willingham Question: What does cognitive science tell us about the existence of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners and the best way to teach them?

We now realize that some students learn more from what they see (visual learners) and other students learn better from what they hear (auditory learners). Do Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Learners Need Visual, Auditory, and Kinesthetic Instruction? By Daniel T.

Willingham Question: What does cognitive science tell us about the existence of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners and the best way to teach them?

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