Imperialism in the late 19th century

The Open Door Notes By the late 19th century, Japan and the European powers had carved much of China into separate spheres of influence, inside of which each held economic dominance. Secretary of State John Hay proposed an "Open Door" policy in China in which all nations would have equal trading and development rights throughout all of China. Such a policy would put all the imperialist powers on equal footing in China and would limit the advantages of having ones own sphere of influence.

Imperialism in the late 19th century

While this website will remain online, it is no longer maintained. History - Dr. We learned about the politics and the divine nature of Manifest Destiny and its effect on American Indians and we also discussed the political and economic policies that promoted industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of corporate America.

These endeavors were part of our domestic policy. Today, we are continuing our chronological story by changing gears and focusing on America's foreign policy at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th Century.

And the above political cartoon is a great place to start So today we begin that outward discussion by examining what most history books call "The Age of Imperialism.

Ambition, interest, land hunger, pride, the mere joy of fighting, whatever it may be, we are animated by a new sensation. We are face to face with a strange destiny. The taste of Empire is in the mouth of the people even as the tast of blood in the jungle. No, He has made us adept in government that we may administer government among savage and senile peoples - He has marked the American people as His chosen nation to finally lead in the redemption of the world.

Beveridge, For the next two days, I challenge you to critically think about the attitudes of these Americans. That at the turn of the century, we were faced with Imperialism in the late 19th century new consciousness," a "new appetite," and a "taste of empire.

These conflicting beliefs about domestic policy will be complicated by the growing conflicting beliefs about foreign policy. To define imperialism and expansionism and how these terms were interpreted in the late 19th Century America. To understand the shifting tides of imperialism at we neared and then entered the 20th Century.

To explore American imperialism in the Caribbean and Latin America. To examine American imperialism in the Pacific Islands. To explore the goals and effectiveness of the anti-imperialist voices. To define imperialism and expansionism and how these terms were interpreted in the late 19th Century America Imperialism - the policy of imposing economic and political control over other peoples in a way that undermines their sovereignty and takes away their freedom to make political and economic decisions.

Imperialism in the late 19th century

As the map below indicates, throughout most the 19th Century, the five largest empires dominated a great deal of the world - England, Spain, France,the Ottoman, and Portugal.

By the early 20th Century, as the map below indicates, most of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Pacific had been divided among these 4 empires, as well as some newer empires - especially the United States, Russia, Belgium, and the Netherlands. With such colonization, each of the empires justified their imperialistic stance by arguing that their colonial domination would "civilize" the backwards people in their areas.

Under this definition of imperialism, why do most of our textbooks refer to Spanish-American War as our first imperialist movement or Teddy Roosevelt as our first imperialist president?

Why wouldn't we look at President Jefferson, Jackson, Monroe, and Polk as imperialists when they made it clear that they believed Euro-Americans had the right to spread from sea to sea and Americanize anyone in their wake? The answer is simple - many historians have argued that beforethe U.

Quest for Empire

This land, they further argued, was intended for Euro-American settlement and for economic expansion - expansion into territory contiguous to the U. Expansion, they claimed, was ordained by God and was not imperialistic - Manifest Destiny!

Europeans were imperialists who took over and completely controlled foreign nations and people; but Americans were simply expansionists who moved into land on a continent waiting for the spread of Americans and American democracy.

Revisionist historians argue otherwise: They believe that westward expansion was indeed imperialistic especially in regard to Americans taking Indian and Mexican lands which undermined their sovereignty and destroyed their self determination.

He cites the U. State Department's list of "interventions"in the 19th Century in the affairs of people beyond our contiguous borders like Argentina, Nicaragua, Japan, China, Angola, Hawaii. He especially points to our territorial expansion into the Pacific. Beforewe had acquired 6 island possessions: As a revisionist historian, he tends to be critical of this quest, arguing that we need to understand the consequences of our imperialist impulses.

Robert Kagan, a conservative historian, in Dangerous Nation agrees with Bender on one major point - that we have always been an imperialist nation and in fact, that we have always been a dangerous nation in the international community.

Kagan, however praises the U.

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So, let's take a look at the shape American imperialism begins to assume toward the end of the 19th Century. To understand the shifting tides of imperialism at we neared and then entered the 20th Century In the s, some Americans began to look at imperialism as an important component of our economic, social, and political growth.

We can see this changing nature of American imperialism especially by looking at the views of powerful Americans toward the turn of the century. Some political leaders were seduced by the notion of becoming a great world power.

Some got caught up in the worldwide scramble for empire.To define imperialism and expansionism and how these terms were interpreted in the late 19th Century America.

The Opium Wars ( & ) Two trading wars in the midth century in which Western nations gained commercial privileges in China. The first Opium War () was between China and Britain, and the second Opium War (), also known as the "Arrow" War, or the Anglo-French War in China, was fought by Britain and France against China.

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Imperialism Imperialism is the domination of one country's political, economic, or cultural life by another. Europeans believed that they had better political, economic, and cultural practices than others. Economic Motivations Industrialization was in full swing by the late 19th century.

[Back to the Unit Nine Summary] The Open Door Notes () By the late 19th century, Japan and the European powers had carved much of China into separate spheres of influence, inside of which each held economic dominance.

During the late 19th century, the idea that the United States had a special mission to uplift "backward" people around the world also com-manded growing support. Whatever its origins, American imperialism experienced its pinnacle from the late s through the years following World War II.

During this “Age of Imperialism,” the United States exerted political, social, and economic control over countries such as the Philippines, Cuba, Germany, Austria, Korea, and Japan.

The Opium Wars ( & )